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Simpler & Better Medicine

One-Year Outcomes after different PCI Strategies in Cardiogenic Shock. — November 13, 2018

One-Year Outcomes after different PCI Strategies in Cardiogenic Shock.

Summary: For patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock due to multi-vessel coronary artery disease, an approach of culprit-lesion-only percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may be associated with lower rates of death or severe renal failure at 30-day follow-up compared to an approach of  immediate multivessel PCI, and the two approaches do not appear to result in significantly different rates of death at 1 year followup.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/30145971/

Strength of Recommendation = B

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Analgesia for management of renal colic in the emergency department. — August 26, 2016

Analgesia for management of renal colic in the emergency department.

Summary: For patients with moderate to severe acute renal colic, intramuscular diclofenac (75 mg) or intravenous paracetamol (1g) may be more likely to provide a 50% reduction in pain at 30 minutes than low-dose intravenous morphine (0.1 mg/kg), and both diclofenac and paracetamol may be associated with a lower likelihood of adverse events compared to morphine.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26993881/

Strength of Recommendation = B

Intravenous paracetamol versus morphine for renal colic. — August 23, 2016
Potassium Supplementation, Diet vs Pills: A Randomized Trial in Postoperative Cardiac Surgery Patients. — July 8, 2016

Potassium Supplementation, Diet vs Pills: A Randomized Trial in Postoperative Cardiac Surgery Patients.

Summary: For patients undergoing cardiac surgery who are treated with diuretics, potassium supplementation with potassium-rich foods (eg, raisins, bananas, potatoes) may lead better patient satisfaction and may lead to a shorter hospital stay than potassium supplementation with potassium chloride pills, and without any worsening in serum potassium levels. (While not specifically tested in this study, it also seems a reasonable extrapolation to assume this would apply to other surgical or medical patients treated with diuretics as well).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/14769716/

Strength of Recommendation = B

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